Lupron, a Drug Used to Delay Puberty, Causes Problems in Women

Lupron was injected in thousands of women in an effort to inhibit puberty or increase height.

More than 10,000 adverse event reports have been filed with the FDA based on the experiences of women who’ve taken Lupron. The reports describe a variety of symptoms experienced by those who took the drug to grow taller or delay puberty. Lupron

Lupron, currently manufactured by AbbVie, is an injection designed to reduce testosterone in men or estrogen in women. The drug is also approved for use by men with prostate cancer.

The experiences of the women that used the drugs are varied but complex. Many women reported experiencing symptoms and conditions linked to older, even elderly people. According to the FDA reports:

A 20-year-old was diagnosed with osteopenia, a thinning of the bones. A 26-year-old in Massachusetts needed a total hip replacement. One 25-year-old woman from Pennsylvania has osteoporosis and a cracked spine. In Wisconsin, another woman in her 20’s  has chronic pain and degenerative disc disease.

Other women described depression and anxiety.

Additionally, the FDA is reviewing deadly seizures caused by the use of Lupron and similar drugs.

The drug has had success in the marketplace. In 2015, the drug-maker reportedly brought in $826 million in sales.

Pharmco Laboratories

SkinCare Co. Pharmco Laboratories Receives Warning From FDA

Pharmco Laboratories received a warning letter from the FDA citing 4 violations.

Pharmco Laboratories received a warning letter from the Food and Drug Administration. The letter to the Florida-based skincare manufacturer “summarized significant violations of current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for finished pharmaceuticals.”

In the letter posted to the agencywebsite, four specific violation were referenced.

Pharmco Laboratories was accused of presenting an allergy risk to consumers. The FDA states that there has been insufficient evidence of the proper cleaning of equipment that came in contact with major allergens. Dietary supplements, for example, containing soybeans used the same dryer as the ingreditents in skincare items.

The FDA warning letter stated that “repeated lapses demonstrate a failure of your executive management to exercise proper oversight and control over the manufacture of drugs.”


Nation’s Largest Drug Distributor to Pay $150M in Settlement

Drug distributor McKesson Corporation will pay a $150 million fine.

Regulators have alleged that McKesson Corporation, a drug distributor, failed to report suspicious orders of painkillers that have been linked to the opioid addiction epidemic.drug

The company has agreed to pay a $150 million fine after they allegedly failed to detect and report suspicious orders of prescription pain pills, according to federal prosecutors. This has arguably led to the growing heroin crisis.

For example, more than 1.6 million orders for controlled substances were filled by McKesson in Colorado between June 2008 through May 2013. However,  just 16 of them from a single customer as suspicious, the Justice Department said.

In a statement from the White House last summer, federal fears related to pain killer and opioid addictions were made clear:

“President [Obama] has made [it] clear that addressing this epidemic is a priority for his Administration.  While Federal agencies have been using their authority to take every available action they can, Congress needs to take action on what is most urgently needed now – additional funding to make lifesaving treatment available to everyone who seeks it. The President has called for $1.1 billion in new funding to help Americans who want treatment get it wherever they live.”

Those addicted to opioid painkillers are most likely to form a heroin addiction according to the Centers for Disease and prevention.

McKesson, the nation’s largest drug distributor,  was accused of failing  to create an effective system to detect suspicious pharmacy orders. This was argued to be a violation of the Controlled Substances Act.

In 2008, McKesson agreed to a $13.25 million civil penalty for actions including failing to report suspicious sales of their drugs on “internet pharmacies.”


In a statement, McKesson said it settled “in the interest of moving beyond disagreements about whether McKesson was complying with the controlled substance regulations … and to instead focus on the company’s partnership with regulators and others to help stem the opioid epidemic in this country.”

Infuse bone graft

Infuse Bone Graft Lawsuit Gets New Life

A lawsuit accusing Medtronics of covering up negative side effects of its Infuse bone graft has been revived by an appeals court.

A lawsuit accusing Medtronic of misleading shareholders by concealing the adverse effects of its Infuse bone graft, has been revived by the The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Paul, Minnesota.

The Infuse bone graft has been used in more than 1 million surgeries. In 2002, the FDA approved the Infuse bone graft for use in specific types of spinal fusion surgeries. The Infuse bone grafts variety are “synthetic, concentrated proteins…mixed with collagen from cows and injected into the spine to alleviate pain.”

The Spine Journal found, in 2011, that the risks of the product had been understated by medical professionals.

In 2012, the U.S. Senate Finance Committee stated that Medtronic, Inc., the manufacturer of the Infuse bone graft, had paid doctors hundreds of millions of dollars to write favorable articles and manipulate studies on the popular product.

In 2013, Medtronic shareholders sued the company claiming that the company’s stock had been inflated due to these unethical activities. As the truth about the product emerged, they have alleged hundreds of millions of dollars in losses.

In 2014, Medtronic agreed to settle its Infuse bone graft lawsuit for $22 million that involves 950 people. Around 2,300 surgeons had used Medtronic products in the US prior to any serious side effects being reported.

An earlier decision in the case judged that shareholders had waited too long before seeking legal action. As 2016 came to a close an appeals court found that the case could still be brought forward.

The case will now be returned to the lower court for further proceedings.

Powdered medical gloves

Powdered Medical Gloves Banned By the FDA

The use of most powdered medical gloves has been banned by the FDA.

For only the second time in history the FDA has banned a medical device. Powdered medical gloves seem to pose adverse risks.Powdered medical gloves

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found that powdered medical gloves (powdered surgeon’s gloves, powdered patient examination gloves, and absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon’s glove) “present an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness or injury.” This has led to a new rule banning these products from use, effective January 18, 2017.

One group has called the ban “18 years too late.” Nearly 20 years ago, in 1998, the advocacy group Public Citizen, filed the first of several citizen’s petition calling on FDA to ban powdered gloves.

After the ban was proposed by the FDA, Public Citizen responded saying that “when a medical product, drug or, in this case device, has unique serious risks but no unique benefit, it should be banned. The FDA’s statement that “we … only take this action when we feel it’s necessary to protect the public health” ignores overwhelming evidence going back almost two decades about the necessity to do so.”

Back in March of 2016, the FDA had prosed the powdered medical gloves citing evidence that they were a  danger to  patients, risks included airway and wound inflammation, post-surgical adhesions and allergic reactions.

Powdered gloves aim to make the removal of gloves easier for medical professionals. So, the FDA had to determine whether the ease of use outweighed the risks.

The rules not that powder is fine when used in the manufacturing process, but should not be a part of the finished product. The rule from the FDA “encourages manufacturers to ensure finished non-powdered gloves have as little powder as possible.”


If you believe that you or a loved one might have suffered from the medical use of powdered gloves, let the Medical Claim Legal Team help.

Oatmeal lawsuit goes class action, glyphosate found

The worst thing ever would be if the stuff that is supposed to be good for you actually wasn’t good for you–and could actually kill you. While the New York Post isn’t exactly known for their patience, they did decide to use the headline “Your Oatmeal May Be Killing You” after reports came out in the New York Times New York Times stating that testing found traces of “glyphosate in some Quaker Oats oatmeal.” Thus begins the so-called “Oatmeal Lawsuit.”

oatmeal lawsuit
Glyphosate reportedly found in oatmeal; used as a herbicide

For those that don’t know, glyphosate is a harmful chemical and can kill you in mass quantities. According to the article in the Times, the chemical was “detected in the oatmeal falls well below the limit set by federal regulators for human consumption….Since oats require less herbicide spray than many other grains, there is less risk of pollutants and groundwater contamination.” The result of this is the “oatmeal lawsuit, “a class-action claim where the plaintiff is seeking $5 million in damages, according to the New York Post. The claim points out that the “100% Natural” claim is actually “‘false, deceptive and misleading,’ because the company uses…glyphosate in processing its oats.”

Obviously this case falls under a number of areas and will be interesting to watch from a product liability and false advertising level. Additionally, the presence of a harmful chemical could bring other agencies and regulatory groups into the mix. This venerable company, founded by Ferdinand Schumacher in Akron, OH in 1850 has certainly been around for awhile and has seen worse–but it certainly can’t exactly help their image and their market share in the ever-growing oatmeal market.