Airbag Recall Looms Over Takata

Takata

The automotive industry has been buzzing lately surrounding the massive airbag crisis caused by Takata, the worlds largest airbag and seat belt supplier. The airbags installed in cars from 2002-2015 have been reported to deploy explosively, injuring hundreds and causing 10 casualties in the U.S.

According to a Consumer Reports article, Fiat Chrysler, Mitsubishi, Toyota, and Volkswagen confirm in a report from Florida Senator Bill Nelson that they are selling some new vehicles with airbags that contain Takata’s ammonium nitrate-based propellant in driver and passenger frontal airbag inflators without a chemical drying agent, also known as a desiccant. These vehicles will have to be recalled by 2018.

The estimated number of recalls needed by 2019 is over 75 million vehicles ranging from 14 different automotive manufacturers. These enormous number of recalls is not only harmful to consumers, it also hurts the entire automotive industry. However, with increased scrutiny being focused on the quality and safety of the airbags, they should become safer in the future so these recalls do not continue to occur.

On April 7, 2016 a 17 year old girl in Texas was killed when shrapnel from an exploding Takata airbag impaled her neck. The fatality marked the 10th life lost due to the malfunctioning airbags. To date, over 8 million airbags have been replaced, but there are still millions more that need to be addressed. The process of replacing all of the airbags that need recalls could take many years, and new cases of faulty airbags continue to be reported frequently. This crisis could open the market for new manufacturers to dethrone Takata as the top dog in the airbag field moving forward. It will be very interesting to see how Takata handles this scenario, their stock prices have plummeted since the reports came out. This story is one that will continue to be in the news as more information comes out.  Infographic-Air bags

Purdue Pharma Under Pressure

PurduePurdue Pharma, makers of OxyContin, are facing some increased scrutiny from the FDA over their marketing of the popular painkiller. Since the release of OxyContin, the packaging has always said “12-hour relief” however in some patients the effects of the drug begin to wear off after about eight hours. This leads to many patients having to take more pills each day than what they were originally prescribed. Opioid addiction is increasing across the country and Purdue is being blamed as one of the leading causes.

In a large-scale investigation of the pharmaceutical company by the LA Times, it was revealed that they knew the effects of OxyContin did not always last 12 hours. The main reasoning for the company’s false advertising was because the 12-hour relief claim gave the drug a large competitive advantage over other, less expensive drugs. In the late 1990’s, doctors began prescribing OxyContin at shorter intervals so Purdue sent a team of sales executives all across the country to convince doctors to stick with the 12-hour doses. According to the LA Times report, More than half of long-term OxyContin users are on doses that public health officials consider dangerously high, according to an analysis of nationwide prescription data conducted for The Times.

In a statement released by Purdue the company had this to say, “Nearly a decade ago, the FDA cited a lack of clinical evidence when it formally rejected the ‘fundamental premise’ that patients receiving OxyContin at intervals more frequent than twice-daily are at increased risk of ‘side effects and serious adverse reactions.’ In doing so, the agency reinforced the twice-daily labeling for OxyContin. The LAT omitted the findings of this report from its story.”

This story will be one that continues to develop and as news comes out, lawsuits may follow. The entire medical world will be following these developments as it could change the market for painkillers in the United States and other countries as well.

Addicts Suing Doctors

Addiction to painkillers, and other opioid drugs, is a serious problem in the state of West Virginia. According to a CBS News report, West Virginia has the highest rate of overdose deaths in the nation. Each year doctors write the equivalent of one painkiller prescription for every man, woman and child in this state of 1.8 million people. The painkiller problem has become so severe that state legislature has stepped in to make changes, and has led to the addicts suing doctors.

More than 30 addicts have sued their doctors for enabling their addiction. Many of these patients suffered from work related injuries and had to rely on painkillers in order to continue working.

Addicts suing doctorsPatients are not the only ones filing lawsuits regarding this subject. West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey has filed a lawsuit against McKesson Corporation, a prescription drug distributor, for allegedly failing to identify, detect, report and help stop the flood of suspicious drug orders into the state.

According to a CBS San Francisco article, The DEA, along with six states, sued McKesson (a San Francisco based company) in 2008 for supplying hundreds of suspicious hydrocodone orders to rogue pharmacies. McKesson settled, paying more than $13 million in fines and agreeing to closely monitor their pill supply.

In research of McKesson’s involvement in West Virginia, it shows that more than 100 million doses of opioids to a state where the population is 1.8 million. This egregious amount of drugs being sent to a state that has the most overdose related deaths in the country is what has put the company in hot water. McKesson could face tens of millions in legal fees, but for a company that makes over a billion dollars that is simply pocket change.

Hopefully the changes made by the legislation in West Virginia can help the addicts recover and find the treatment they need.

 

 

Pelvic Mesh Lawsuit

Pelvic mesh lawsuit
Johnson & Johnson faces a massive pelvic mesh lawsuit

Johnson & Johnson is back in the news, although it is not they type of news they would like to hear. The company is entrenched in a pelvic mesh lawsuit that has already seen over 100 cases settled in the past year, and faces over 30,000 more cases that have yet to be heard. While the exact settlement numbers have not been released by Johnson & Johnson, it is speculated that the company could lose millions.

What is the Reason for the Lawsuits?

The pelvic mesh lawsuits are flooding in from patients all over the country who have experienced severe side effects from the mesh. The claims are being made that Johnson & Johnson did not properly market the products, failing to cite the side effects that were caused by the product.

In a report by the Associated Press, Attorneys General Bob Ferguson of Washington and Kamala Harris of California accused the New Jersey-based health care giant of neglecting to tell patients and doctors about the risks and occurrences of dire, sometimes irreversible complications. Those include urinary dysfunction, loss of sexual function, constipation and severe pain. These side effects can make everyday activities such as walking up and down stairs, laying down, or exercising extremely painful.

In a Reuters article, it is stated that Johnson & Johnson sold more than 787,000 pelvic mesh devices in the United States from 2008 until 2014, including more than 42,000 in California. Also in that article, the Food and Drug Administration said it was reclassifying mesh used to treat pelvic organ prolapse trans-vaginally from class II, or moderate risk, to class III, for high-risk devices, which will require manufacturers to submit extensive data to establish the devices’ safety. Hopefully this increased scrutiny by the FDA will prevent something like this from happening again in the future.

Invokana Lawsuit

Invokana Lawsuit
Invokana, a diabetes treatment drug that has led to cases of Ketoacidosis.

Invokana is a drug used for treatment of type-2 diabetes that has recently become the topic of many lawsuits in North America. The purpose of the drug is to maintain blood sugar levels in the patient by forcing the kidneys to release excess sugar through urination. This causes more stress on the kidneys than what is typically put on them without the drug. The Invokana lawsuit is growing everyday as more patients have been affected by the drug.

What is the reason for the lawsuits?

According to the FDA there have been 19 filed claims of people who developed blood and kidney infections as a result of Invokana. According to Digital Journal, all of the patients filing the Invokana lawsuit alleged to have required hospitalization and kidney failure treatment with dialysis.  The first side effect that can cause serious health issues is an increase in the amount of acid in the blood, as well as Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). These harmful side effects have led to the hospitalization of many Invokana users. Another serious side effect of the drug is Ketoacidosis. In another post by Digital Journal,  many patients have filed lawsuits against manufacturers claiming that the drug causes severe side effects and that the companies were negligent in communicating the risks associated with the drugs.

What is Ketoacidosis?

Ketoacidosis is defined by the FDA as “a serious condition in which the body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones.  Symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, tiredness, and trouble breathing.  Patients should also be alert for signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection, such as a feeling of burning when urinating or the need to urinate often or right away; pain in the lower part of the stomach area or pelvis; fever; or blood in the urine.” If you have experienced symptoms of Ketoacidosis, you should contact a doctor immediately.

 

Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder Lawsuit

A common household item, talcum powder (baby powder) has recently made headlines involving a 72 million dollar lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson. The baby powder lawsuit was filed by the family of a deceased woman who’s ovarian cancer was linked to the use of the product for feminine hygiene.

Common Uses of Baby Powder

  • Pet Cleaner
  • Deodorant
  • Baby/Feminine Care
Baby Powder Lawsuit
The Johnson & Johnson baby powder lawsuits have reached upwards of 1,200 still-pending cases.

Jackie Fox of Birmingham, Alabama was diagnosed with ovarian cancer roughly two years before her death. At the time of her passing in the fall of 2015, she was involved in a 60-person lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson, where her son took over as the plaintiff. The lawsuit resulted in the company owing Fox $10 million in actual damages, and $62 million in punitive damages. According to an AP article, the verdict “doesn’t bode well for Johnson & Johnson” as there are over 1,200 still-pending lawsuits and thousands more are expected.

The ingredient talc, in baby powder, had once contained asbestos which was extremely dangerous and there is speculation of some contamination in the product, but modern baby powder is reportedly asbestos-free. Although the modern powder is “safer” there were dozens of women who sued Johnson & Johnson according to USA Today. The cause and effect relationship between the baby powder and ovarian cancer is somewhat inconclusive according to an ABC News article about the subject, but there are thousands of lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson regarding this matter.

 

Why Medical Claim Legal is Right for Your Case

A consultation with our lawyers at Medical Claim Legal is free.  We will assure a lawyer with specific training in the consumer protection litigation field is assigned to your case.  If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer that may be linked to the use of baby powder, you deserve compensation.  Let us help you start the process towards that claim today.

Oatmeal lawsuit goes class action, glyphosate found

The worst thing ever would be if the stuff that is supposed to be good for you actually wasn’t good for you–and could actually kill you. While the New York Post isn’t exactly known for their patience, they did decide to use the headline “Your Oatmeal May Be Killing You” after reports came out in the New York Times New York Times stating that testing found traces of “glyphosate in some Quaker Oats oatmeal.” Thus begins the so-called “Oatmeal Lawsuit.”

oatmeal lawsuit
Glyphosate reportedly found in oatmeal; used as a herbicide

For those that don’t know, glyphosate is a harmful chemical and can kill you in mass quantities. According to the article in the Times, the chemical was “detected in the oatmeal falls well below the limit set by federal regulators for human consumption….Since oats require less herbicide spray than many other grains, there is less risk of pollutants and groundwater contamination.” The result of this is the “oatmeal lawsuit, “a class-action claim where the plaintiff is seeking $5 million in damages, according to the New York Post. The claim points out that the “100% Natural” claim is actually “‘false, deceptive and misleading,’ because the company uses…glyphosate in processing its oats.”

Obviously this case falls under a number of areas and will be interesting to watch from a product liability and false advertising level. Additionally, the presence of a harmful chemical could bring other agencies and regulatory groups into the mix. This venerable company, founded by Ferdinand Schumacher in Akron, OH in 1850 has certainly been around for awhile and has seen worse–but it certainly can’t exactly help their image and their market share in the ever-growing oatmeal market.

Zofran Lawsuit Continues to Gain Plaintiffs

The story is a pretty well-known one by now: Zofran was created in 1991 by medical manufacturing giant GlaxoSmithKline and grew to become one of the most popular drugs ever. The actual medication works by limiting the amount of serotonin that gets to the part of the human brain that triggers nausea and vomiting. Obviously this is the kind of thing that a pregnant mother would love. Unfortunately the FDA only permitted the use of Zofran to surgery and cancer patients—not pregnant women.  Additionally, reports now allege that GlaxoSmithKline knew the product could be potentially hazardous to pregnant mothers and could cause birth defects.  The reality is pregnant women did take the medication and sadly many birth defects occurred, including musculoskeletal abnormalities, club foot, cleft lip, cleft palate, jaundice and heart deficiencies. This has caused a number of Zofran lawsuit claims to be filed.

The Zofran Lawsuit continues to gain plaintiffs
The Zofran Lawsuit continues to gain plaintiffs

Similar charges were brought by the Department of Justice, in one of the largest alleged health care fraud in history, a case GlaxoSmithKline settled for $3 billion. What is more stunning is additional plaintiffs have come forward now claiming the company has hid evidence of Zofran’s alleged link to major birth defects for more than two decades.

If you are interested in the December 2014 study that showed the impact of the drug on young mothers from Dr. Gideon Korenin in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology you can find that here.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration [FDA] issued their formal warnings and instructions on Zofran here.

When lawsuits are brought against a pharmaceutical manufacturer such as GlaxoSmithKline, they either end in a financial settlement for the plaintiff or the lawsuits go to trial.  Generally, zofran lawsuit claims are settled prior to a trial. Medical Claim Legal and its experts have assisted Zofran lawsuit plaintiffs in similar claims.

Invokana, Lawsuits and Johnson & Johnson

Two new recent lawsuits were filed in New Jersey federal court against giant Johnson & Johnson, who face allegations that users of its diabetes drug, Invokana, developed kidney damage and heart disease. These revelations include claims by defendants who say they suffered kidney damage after being prescribed Invokana for diabetes. One patient actually suffered a stroke.

According to New Jersey Law Journal, the suit includes claims for “failure to warn, defective manufacturing, breach of express warranty, breach of warranty of fitness for everyday use, negligence, breach of implied warranty, fraudulent misrepresentation, negligent misrepresentation, fraudulent concealment and fraud.”

Background on Invokana Lawsuits

Lawsuits Against Johnson & Johnson's Diabetes 2 Medication, Invokana, Continue
Lawsuits Continue Against Johnson & Johnson’s Diabetes 2 Medication, Invokana

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2013 for treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Two years later, the FDA issued a warning about Invokana and Invokamet stating that they may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis – a serious condition in which the body produces high levels of blood acids known as ketones. An analysis of incidents reported to the FDA shows patients taking Invokana for diabetes are several times more likely to report kidney disease than those taking other types of diabetes treatment, the complaints allege.

Johnson & Johnson Invokana History

According to court papers, Invokana made Johnson & Johnson $278 million in the first quarter of 2015, so clearly they have much at stake. A statement from Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman Kaitlin Meiser said: “Invokana is an important medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. With real world experience that includes more than five million prescriptions to date, we are confident in the overall safety profile of Invokana. The company remains committed to aggressively defending against allegations made in these lawsuits.”

Medical Claim Legal and Lawsuits Against Johnson & Johnson

Our team of lawyers has worked on medical claim lawsuits against firms like Johnson & Johnson and will work to get you the attention and claims you deserve. Again, MedicalClaimLegal does not get compensated, unless you do.

 

 

Airbag Recall Impacts Millions

Airbags are safety devices found in just about every vehicle on the road in the United States. Their intention is pure, they are intended to keep vehicle occupants safe in the event of a collision. Although they usually do, like anything else airbags can fail to operate as intended. At times, due to defective designs, automotive companies may issue an airbag recall. This happens when they fail to keep vehicle occupants safe. When passengers suffer an injury or death due to an airbag malfunction, they may be entitled to compensation.

Takata Recall

airbag recall
Airbags in general are not a dangerous. The Department of Transportation reports that, in the last 30 years, frontal airbags have saved more than 37,000 lives.                         (Photo Credit: Melissa Clark)

Airbag recalls are common. Recently, Honda, the Japanese automobile manufacturer, came clean. They revealed that they had knowledge of defective airbags produced by Takata, years before informing federal regulators and triggering a massive airbag recall.

The airbags in question have exploded during impacts and caused serious injuries and deaths. Takata is an automotive parts company that provides products such as airbags for major car manufacturers. Although Honda is believed to have been most impacted, the defective airbags plague more vehicles than Takata originally suggested in 2013.

In 2015, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued a list to the public of 14 other automakers impacted by the Takata airbag recall. That equals 28 million vehicles with unsafe airbags. Globally, 10 deaths (most in the United States) and more than 100 serious injuries have been linked to these faulty airbags. From burns to air bag chest injuries or death, trauma from airbags are a serious matter.

Recall History

Airbag recalls are nothing new. In 2014 Nissan recalled close to 1 million vehicles due to faulty airbags. Now, over one year later, federal regulators suggest that that they have not made the necessary changes. Many other airbag producers and automakers face legal liability when injuries and death are caused by airbags. In reference to the Takata recall, only about $7.5 million airbags have been repaired, the probability of future injuries remains high.

Airbag Recall Compensation

Replacing these airbags are estimated to cost up to $24 billion dollars. That does not include the coming legal obligations that Takata and automakers might face for medical liabilities. Airbags in general are not a dangerous. The Department of Transportation reports that, in the last 30 years, frontal airbags have saved more than 37,000 lives.  That does not undermine the thousands of individuals have sustained injuries in the last 10 years, some of which are ignored or misdiagnosed.Whether an injury was caused by the Takata airbag or any other legal action may be necessary. If you or a loved one have experience serious bodily injury or death, due to an airbag malfunction, you may be entitled to financial compensation.